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Sir Allen Stanford (CIA Asset?)
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FINCEN
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 29, 2010 9:38 pm    Post subject: Sir Allen Stanford (CIA Asset?) Reply with quote

Sir Allen Stanford in spotlight over CIA spying row with Venezuela
Sir Allen Stanford, the Texan billionaire who organised the controversial $20 million tournament which split the world of cricket, is now at the centre of an international spying row, it can be revealed.

By Patrick Sawer Published: 8:37PM GMT 08 Nov 2008

Officials from Venezuelan military intelligence raided a branch of his offshore bank over claims that its employees were paid by the CIA to spy on the south American country. The officials spent three hours searching files and documents at offices of Stanford International Banks in the Venezuelan capital Caracas, removing several of them for closer inspection. Under the spotlight: Sir Allen Stanford is embroiled in CIA spying row

The Stanford Group's spokeswoman, Lula Rodriguez, denied that any of the bank's employees were involved in spying. She said: "As an international company, operating in over 12 countries, it is our global policy to respect and operate under the laws and regulatory framework of every country in which we operate. It is also our global policy to cooperate with any country's investigative authorities when asked to do so."

The raid came on the eve of Sir Allen's Twenty20 for $20m tournament last Saturday, which saw England comprehensively beaten by a team of West Indies stars playing under the tycoon's name at his personal cricket ground on the Caribbean island of Antigua. The controversy will raise further questions about Sir Allen's involvement with English cricket, which many see as damaging to the sport's reputation.

The English Cricket Board has signed a $100 million five-year deal with the Texan allowing him to stage a total of five winner-takes-all Twenty20 tournaments. Under the deal Sir Allen has promised to contribute several million dollars to the development of the game in England and the Caribbean. An ECB spokesman said: "We don't comment on the business of our sponsors." But the fact that Stanford had to publicly deny rumours that his fiancee had an affair with one of the cricketers taking part in the tournament, as well as pictures of him cavorting with some of the England players' wives and girlfriends during the tournament, did little to allay the fears of critics, who claim the deal has turned the game into a money-grabbing circus.

In the raid on Oct 31, officials arrived at the bank's offices in Caracas's Avenida Tamanaco armed with search warrants on the orders of Venezuela's chief military prosecutor, General Ernesto Cedeno. State-owned broadcaster Venezolana TV reported that the raid was part of an investigation into individuals it said had "allegedly committed the crime of espionage" and "may have been part of the US government".

It is understood the spying claims centre on three of the bank's employees and in particular its head of security, who had previously worked for the US federal government. He was first accused of being a CIA spy when he was hired by Stanford just over two years ago.

Sources suggest the case may have been revived as an anti-US propaganda ploy to boost the popularity of President Hugo Chavez in local and regional elections being staged this month.
Venezuela's left-wing president, who has long been a thorn in the side of the US Government, is currently in the process of nationalizing the Spanish owned Bank of Venezuela and last year threatened to take over the entire banking sector. Stanford International Bank handles $51 billion in worldwide deposits and assets. Sir Allen has built up a personal fortune of $2.2 billion despite a period of bankruptcy in the 1980s.
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beemoe
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Joined: 07 May 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2010 10:34 pm    Post subject: From Beemoe Reply with quote

Why do I think this thing about banks and intell sounds fimilar like Nugan-Hand or Castle?

Speaking of N-H or Castle did you ever think of the Lansky / Bronfmann / Rothschild thang as laundering through these banks as well as Mary Carter Paints?
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FINCEN
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 08, 2010 3:57 pm    Post subject: NH, Castle, MC Paints Reply with quote

Absolutely. There were a number of other ventures used in precisely the same manner as we are witnessing around the globe.
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FINCEN
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 8:21 pm    Post subject: Interesting turn of events regarding Stanford Financial... Reply with quote


Allen Stanford's Trial Indefinitely Delayed. Suspected CIA Banker Became "Drug Dependent" -- in Federal Custody

by Tom Burghardt Global Research.ca





The strange case of accused swindler and suspected CIA banker R. Allen Stanford became a whole lot stranger last week. During a preliminary hearing in Houston, U.S. District Judge David Hittner ruled that Stanford, charged with orchestrating an $8 billion dollar Ponzi scheme that defrauded thousands of investors, cannot be tried until he undergoes detoxification for a drug addiction acquired after his incarceration in a federal detention facility. Talk about a convenient turn of events! "Nothing can be done until the medical aspect is cleared up," Hittner told defense lawyers and prosecutors during an all-day hearing that examined Stanford's mental competence to stand trial, Bloomberg News reported. The banker's court-appointed defense team is seeking a two-year delay, citing the mountain of evidence, some two million pages at last count, they must review before the trial can proceed. Stanford's apparent inability to participate in his own defense would certainly complicate matters. With a net worth once estimated at $2 billion, the accused fraudster was declared indigent last fall after his assets were seized and (known) accounts frozen following his 2009 arrest and indictment. In October, U.S. District Judge Nancy Atlas ruled that Stanford and codefendants Laura Pendergest-Holt, Gilberto Lopez, Mark Kuhurt and Leroy King, the former chief regulator of the Bank of Antigua, cannot tap a $100 million Lloyds of London insurance policy to pay attorney fees. According to the ruling, "lawyers for Lloyds had proven at a trial in August that it was likely that Stanford had committed money laundering." The court declared "that the policy's money laundering exclusion applies to justify underwriters' denial of insurance coverage at this time," Reuters reported.

Indicted eighteen months ago on 21 civil and criminal counts, including mail, wire, securities fraud and money laundering, Stanford is also suspected of running another in a long line of "full service banks" for American secret state agencies, including the CIA. Interestingly enough, one of Stanford's early defense teams was led by none other than Robert S. Bennett, the high-powered attorney who successfully fought off prosecution for his client, Jose A. Rodriguez, the former head of the CIA's clandestine division, accused of destroying 92 torture videotapes of prisoners held at Agency "black sites." This latest twist in the sleazy affair raise uncomfortable questions for prosecutors: just how does one become drug addicted while in federal custody? According to Bloomberg, "three psychiatrists, one working for the government and two working for the defense, testified that Stanford's dependency on prescription anti-anxiety medication and the after-effects of a head injury he sustained in a jailhouse beating left him unfit for the trial" which was slated to begin later this month. Victor Scarano, a defense psychiatrist testified that the banker's dependency on the anti-anxiety drug clonazepam, along with the powerful anti-depressant mirtazapine, was the result of "overmedication" by his jailers.

Scarano testified that for more than a year Stanford "has been taking 3 milligrams a day of the anti-anxiety drug clonazepam, and that a normal dose is up to 1 milligram a day for no longer than two weeks," the Houston Chronicle disclosed. The psychiatrist told the court that "he is unable to work effectively and rationally with his attorneys in his defense against the charges." "He is unable to focus, he's unable to keep a train of thought," Scarano testified. A second psychiatrist, Steven Rosenblatt, hired by the government, "testified that Stanford is suffering from delirium, likely brought on by the medication." During Thursday's hearing, Stanford's attorney Ali Fazel, told the court that his client had been assaulted while in federal custody, severely beaten and that it was prison physicians who prescribed the medications to which the accused swindler is now addicted. "It's the government that caused the problem," Fazel said. The Independent averred this will raise "fresh and disturbing questions about the deterioration of Stanford's mental and physical health in the 18 months he has already spent behind bars." Among the questions likely to be raised is why, for some unknown and still unexplained reason prison doctors dispensed triple the normal dose of a suite of drugs known to produce untoward side effects. While Stanford's "overmedication" may have an innocent explanation, we cannot dismiss the possibility that someone or some entity perhaps, say an intelligence agency with decades of pharmacological knowledge derived from illicit human experiments might be interested in inducing permanent "cognitive impairment" in the dodgy banker. A simpler explanation however, such as gross negligence on the part of his jailers cannot be ruled out. It is even quite possible, as assistant U.S. attorney Gregg Costa asserted, that Stanford "could have been faking the delirium in order to be let out of jail before facing trial" as The New York Times reported.

And given the wretched conditions that exist in American gulags, where control of prison populations through overmedication is the norm not the exception, this could also be a mitigating factor in Stanford's case. As Human Rights Watch points out, prisoners adjudged mentally ill often receive "inappropriate kinds or amounts of psychotropic medication that further impairs their ability to function." On the other hand, Allen Stanford's high-profile, his close proximity to drug-fueled intelligence operations, decades of hastily-closed investigations into alleged security frauds and a "stand down" by the SEC "at the request of another federal agency" as The New York Times disclosed, coupled with drugs investigations that "lie buried in the paperwork" gathered by the SEC as the Houston Chronicle averred, however one cares to slice it, a drug addiction acquired in federal custody does open a new, and highly suspicious, chapter in the Stanford drama. The maddeningly complex character of Allen Stanford's operations as the Financial Times revealed, and what role other giant banks including Bank Julius Baer, Credit Suisse and HSBC, which acted as SIB's correspondent bank for all European deposits played in the affair, may never be unraveled if he cannot stand trial. In this respect, a permanent "inability to recall the recent past" induced by federal prison authorities may be just what the doctor ordered.
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FINCEN
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A witness in the case of international financier R. Allen Stanford progressed this week with details of questionable activities committed by the prosecutions chief witness former Stanford Financial CFO James Davis. According to the testimony of Lind Wingfield, Stanford's former executive director of special projects, Davis allegedly forged Stanford's signature on a document in 2007 that abolished a department reportedly created to "reel in expenses." According to Wingfield's testimony Davis retained exclusive access to a corporate computer system that contained Stanford Financial Groups financial records. Wingfield also testified about Davis ignoring or circumventing policies instituted by Stanford to "clamp down on expenditures." Stanford is accused of using investor funds to support a lavish lifestyle which included international travel, the construction of an Antiguan resort complex and other expenditures. Stanford has countered that Davis and the court appointed receiver both damaged the companies financial status with ill-advised moves and fraud.
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